Six-banded Armadillo

Euphractus sexcinctus

Six-banded armadillo live in the grasslands, open plains and rainforests of south America in and around Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay and Bolivia.

Unlike most armadillos, the six-banded armadillo is mostly diurnal so they are active during the day. They dig large, U-shaped dens up to two meters deep to sleep in at night but only stay in the same place for a few days at a time.

Armadillos are omnivorous which means they eat a variety of fruit, veg, insects, small animals and carrion. Due to their poor eyesight, armadillos rely on their sense of smell to detect prey underground and potential predators.

Armadillo armor is made from overlapping plates of bone covered in scales of keratin. Unlike other species of armadillo, the six-banded armadillo can’t roll into a ball, so they avoid their predators by fleeing into a nearby burrow.

The six-banded armadillo is classified by the IUCN Red list as Least Concern. They are widespread throughout South America, but are hunted in relatively large numbers for meat and medicinal uses as well as persecuted as an agricultural pest.

Our armadillos at Fife Zoo live in a large mixed exhibit with our Azara’s agoutis.

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HABITAT

Six-banded armadillo live in the grasslands, open plains and rainforests of south America in and around Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay and Bolivia.

DIET

Armadillos are omnivores so eat a variety of fruit, veg, insects, small animals and carrion.

THREATS

Armadillos are widespread throughout South America, even though they are hunted in relatively large numbers and persecuted as an agricultural pest.

CONSERVATION

LEAST CONCERN

They are relatively widespread within South America, present in several protected areas and have no major threats.

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